The world is the closed door. It is a barrier. And at the same time it is the way through.

Two prisoners whose cells adjoin communicate with each other by knocking on the wall. The wall is the thing which separates them but it is also their means of communication. … Every separation is a link.

Simone Weil, Gravity and Grace

The original premiere cut of Metropolis eventually disappeared, and a quarter of the original film was long believed to be lost forever. However on July 1st 2008, film experts in Berlin announced that a 16 mm reduction negative of the original cut of the film had been discovered in the archives of the Museo del Cine in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Along with additional footage found in New Zealand, a long restoration process began. The fully restored film was finally shown on large screens in Berlin and Frankfurt simultaneously on February 12th 2010
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The original premiere cut of Metropolis eventually disappeared, and a quarter of the original film was long believed to be lost forever. However on July 1st 2008, film experts in Berlin announced that a 16 mm reduction negative of the original cut of the film had been discovered in the archives of the Museo del Cine in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Along with additional footage found in New Zealand, a long restoration process began. The fully restored film was finally shown on large screens in Berlin and Frankfurt simultaneously on February 12th 2010
ZoomInfo

The original premiere cut of Metropolis eventually disappeared, and a quarter of the original film was long believed to be lost forever. However on July 1st 2008, film experts in Berlin announced that a 16 mm reduction negative of the original cut of the film had been discovered in the archives of the Museo del Cine in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Along with additional footage found in New Zealand, a long restoration process began. The fully restored film was finally shown on large screens in Berlin and Frankfurt simultaneously on February 12th 2010
ZoomInfo

The original premiere cut of Metropolis eventually disappeared, and a quarter of the original film was long believed to be lost forever. However on July 1st 2008, film experts in Berlin announced that a 16 mm reduction negative of the original cut of the film had been discovered in the archives of the Museo del Cine in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Along with additional footage found in New Zealand, a long restoration process began. The fully restored film was finally shown on large screens in Berlin and Frankfurt simultaneously on February 12th 2010
ZoomInfo

The original premiere cut of Metropolis eventually disappeared, and a quarter of the original film was long believed to be lost forever. However on July 1st 2008, film experts in Berlin announced that a 16 mm reduction negative of the original cut of the film had been discovered in the archives of the Museo del Cine in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Along with additional footage found in New Zealand, a long restoration process began. The fully restored film was finally shown on large screens in Berlin and Frankfurt simultaneously on February 12th 2010
ZoomInfo

The original premiere cut of Metropolis eventually disappeared, and a quarter of the original film was long believed to be lost forever. However on July 1st 2008, film experts in Berlin announced that a 16 mm reduction negative of the original cut of the film had been discovered in the archives of the Museo del Cine in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Along with additional footage found in New Zealand, a long restoration process began. The fully restored film was finally shown on large screens in Berlin and Frankfurt simultaneously on February 12th 2010
ZoomInfo

The original premiere cut of Metropolis eventually disappeared, and a quarter of the original film was long believed to be lost forever. However on July 1st 2008, film experts in Berlin announced that a 16 mm reduction negative of the original cut of the film had been discovered in the archives of the Museo del Cine in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Along with additional footage found in New Zealand, a long restoration process began. The fully restored film was finally shown on large screens in Berlin and Frankfurt simultaneously on February 12th 2010
ZoomInfo

The original premiere cut of Metropolis eventually disappeared, and a quarter of the original film was long believed to be lost forever. However on July 1st 2008, film experts in Berlin announced that a 16 mm reduction negative of the original cut of the film had been discovered in the archives of the Museo del Cine in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Along with additional footage found in New Zealand, a long restoration process began. The fully restored film was finally shown on large screens in Berlin and Frankfurt simultaneously on February 12th 2010
ZoomInfo

The original premiere cut of Metropolis eventually disappeared, and a quarter of the original film was long believed to be lost forever. However on July 1st 2008, film experts in Berlin announced that a 16 mm reduction negative of the original cut of the film had been discovered in the archives of the Museo del Cine in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Along with additional footage found in New Zealand, a long restoration process began. The fully restored film was finally shown on large screens in Berlin and Frankfurt simultaneously on February 12th 2010

(via vintage-manor)

Source: darrenaronofskys

renekita:

Finland has what you might call a low nonsense culture. Things are what they are and there is little need to engage in metaphysics about it or decorate life with pretty illusions.
Perhaps it stems from the fact that our language has even less of a future tense than English. There is no really comfortable way of saying: “Tomorrow, I will have done this.” “Huomenna tulen olemaan tehnyt tämän.” Oh no. It’s always rather: “Saan tuon huomenna valmiiksi.” (= I finish that tomorrow.) Compared with the baroque constructions of various future tenses German allows that is nothing. So it’s no wonder Germans tend to live in the future and Finns right now. For a German, most things are tinged with a sense of what they will or should look like tomorrow. It’s what drives them. I’m not sure Finns see any point in that.
Having grown up in Germany, I’m stuck in between. Perhaps this project also reflects that. The completed million faces loom in my future, but in practice it’s a series of moments of instant gratification. Drawing so quickly that there’s no time to plan. I just react to the lines already there to guide the flying brush elsewhere in rhythm or against their rhythm. Picture done, I lay it away, and a new blank paper is in front of me, to be defaced (enfaced rather?) without any regard for the previous or next one.
Now, my Finnish soul rebels against these ponderings. It’s ink on paper, it’s more fun than doing nothing and I sleep better after a hundred of these. That’s enough.
ZoomInfo
renekita:

Finland has what you might call a low nonsense culture. Things are what they are and there is little need to engage in metaphysics about it or decorate life with pretty illusions.
Perhaps it stems from the fact that our language has even less of a future tense than English. There is no really comfortable way of saying: “Tomorrow, I will have done this.” “Huomenna tulen olemaan tehnyt tämän.” Oh no. It’s always rather: “Saan tuon huomenna valmiiksi.” (= I finish that tomorrow.) Compared with the baroque constructions of various future tenses German allows that is nothing. So it’s no wonder Germans tend to live in the future and Finns right now. For a German, most things are tinged with a sense of what they will or should look like tomorrow. It’s what drives them. I’m not sure Finns see any point in that.
Having grown up in Germany, I’m stuck in between. Perhaps this project also reflects that. The completed million faces loom in my future, but in practice it’s a series of moments of instant gratification. Drawing so quickly that there’s no time to plan. I just react to the lines already there to guide the flying brush elsewhere in rhythm or against their rhythm. Picture done, I lay it away, and a new blank paper is in front of me, to be defaced (enfaced rather?) without any regard for the previous or next one.
Now, my Finnish soul rebels against these ponderings. It’s ink on paper, it’s more fun than doing nothing and I sleep better after a hundred of these. That’s enough.
ZoomInfo
renekita:

Finland has what you might call a low nonsense culture. Things are what they are and there is little need to engage in metaphysics about it or decorate life with pretty illusions.
Perhaps it stems from the fact that our language has even less of a future tense than English. There is no really comfortable way of saying: “Tomorrow, I will have done this.” “Huomenna tulen olemaan tehnyt tämän.” Oh no. It’s always rather: “Saan tuon huomenna valmiiksi.” (= I finish that tomorrow.) Compared with the baroque constructions of various future tenses German allows that is nothing. So it’s no wonder Germans tend to live in the future and Finns right now. For a German, most things are tinged with a sense of what they will or should look like tomorrow. It’s what drives them. I’m not sure Finns see any point in that.
Having grown up in Germany, I’m stuck in between. Perhaps this project also reflects that. The completed million faces loom in my future, but in practice it’s a series of moments of instant gratification. Drawing so quickly that there’s no time to plan. I just react to the lines already there to guide the flying brush elsewhere in rhythm or against their rhythm. Picture done, I lay it away, and a new blank paper is in front of me, to be defaced (enfaced rather?) without any regard for the previous or next one.
Now, my Finnish soul rebels against these ponderings. It’s ink on paper, it’s more fun than doing nothing and I sleep better after a hundred of these. That’s enough.
ZoomInfo
renekita:

Finland has what you might call a low nonsense culture. Things are what they are and there is little need to engage in metaphysics about it or decorate life with pretty illusions.
Perhaps it stems from the fact that our language has even less of a future tense than English. There is no really comfortable way of saying: “Tomorrow, I will have done this.” “Huomenna tulen olemaan tehnyt tämän.” Oh no. It’s always rather: “Saan tuon huomenna valmiiksi.” (= I finish that tomorrow.) Compared with the baroque constructions of various future tenses German allows that is nothing. So it’s no wonder Germans tend to live in the future and Finns right now. For a German, most things are tinged with a sense of what they will or should look like tomorrow. It’s what drives them. I’m not sure Finns see any point in that.
Having grown up in Germany, I’m stuck in between. Perhaps this project also reflects that. The completed million faces loom in my future, but in practice it’s a series of moments of instant gratification. Drawing so quickly that there’s no time to plan. I just react to the lines already there to guide the flying brush elsewhere in rhythm or against their rhythm. Picture done, I lay it away, and a new blank paper is in front of me, to be defaced (enfaced rather?) without any regard for the previous or next one.
Now, my Finnish soul rebels against these ponderings. It’s ink on paper, it’s more fun than doing nothing and I sleep better after a hundred of these. That’s enough.
ZoomInfo
renekita:

Finland has what you might call a low nonsense culture. Things are what they are and there is little need to engage in metaphysics about it or decorate life with pretty illusions.
Perhaps it stems from the fact that our language has even less of a future tense than English. There is no really comfortable way of saying: “Tomorrow, I will have done this.” “Huomenna tulen olemaan tehnyt tämän.” Oh no. It’s always rather: “Saan tuon huomenna valmiiksi.” (= I finish that tomorrow.) Compared with the baroque constructions of various future tenses German allows that is nothing. So it’s no wonder Germans tend to live in the future and Finns right now. For a German, most things are tinged with a sense of what they will or should look like tomorrow. It’s what drives them. I’m not sure Finns see any point in that.
Having grown up in Germany, I’m stuck in between. Perhaps this project also reflects that. The completed million faces loom in my future, but in practice it’s a series of moments of instant gratification. Drawing so quickly that there’s no time to plan. I just react to the lines already there to guide the flying brush elsewhere in rhythm or against their rhythm. Picture done, I lay it away, and a new blank paper is in front of me, to be defaced (enfaced rather?) without any regard for the previous or next one.
Now, my Finnish soul rebels against these ponderings. It’s ink on paper, it’s more fun than doing nothing and I sleep better after a hundred of these. That’s enough.
ZoomInfo
renekita:

Finland has what you might call a low nonsense culture. Things are what they are and there is little need to engage in metaphysics about it or decorate life with pretty illusions.
Perhaps it stems from the fact that our language has even less of a future tense than English. There is no really comfortable way of saying: “Tomorrow, I will have done this.” “Huomenna tulen olemaan tehnyt tämän.” Oh no. It’s always rather: “Saan tuon huomenna valmiiksi.” (= I finish that tomorrow.) Compared with the baroque constructions of various future tenses German allows that is nothing. So it’s no wonder Germans tend to live in the future and Finns right now. For a German, most things are tinged with a sense of what they will or should look like tomorrow. It’s what drives them. I’m not sure Finns see any point in that.
Having grown up in Germany, I’m stuck in between. Perhaps this project also reflects that. The completed million faces loom in my future, but in practice it’s a series of moments of instant gratification. Drawing so quickly that there’s no time to plan. I just react to the lines already there to guide the flying brush elsewhere in rhythm or against their rhythm. Picture done, I lay it away, and a new blank paper is in front of me, to be defaced (enfaced rather?) without any regard for the previous or next one.
Now, my Finnish soul rebels against these ponderings. It’s ink on paper, it’s more fun than doing nothing and I sleep better after a hundred of these. That’s enough.
ZoomInfo
renekita:

Finland has what you might call a low nonsense culture. Things are what they are and there is little need to engage in metaphysics about it or decorate life with pretty illusions.
Perhaps it stems from the fact that our language has even less of a future tense than English. There is no really comfortable way of saying: “Tomorrow, I will have done this.” “Huomenna tulen olemaan tehnyt tämän.” Oh no. It’s always rather: “Saan tuon huomenna valmiiksi.” (= I finish that tomorrow.) Compared with the baroque constructions of various future tenses German allows that is nothing. So it’s no wonder Germans tend to live in the future and Finns right now. For a German, most things are tinged with a sense of what they will or should look like tomorrow. It’s what drives them. I’m not sure Finns see any point in that.
Having grown up in Germany, I’m stuck in between. Perhaps this project also reflects that. The completed million faces loom in my future, but in practice it’s a series of moments of instant gratification. Drawing so quickly that there’s no time to plan. I just react to the lines already there to guide the flying brush elsewhere in rhythm or against their rhythm. Picture done, I lay it away, and a new blank paper is in front of me, to be defaced (enfaced rather?) without any regard for the previous or next one.
Now, my Finnish soul rebels against these ponderings. It’s ink on paper, it’s more fun than doing nothing and I sleep better after a hundred of these. That’s enough.
ZoomInfo
renekita:

Finland has what you might call a low nonsense culture. Things are what they are and there is little need to engage in metaphysics about it or decorate life with pretty illusions.
Perhaps it stems from the fact that our language has even less of a future tense than English. There is no really comfortable way of saying: “Tomorrow, I will have done this.” “Huomenna tulen olemaan tehnyt tämän.” Oh no. It’s always rather: “Saan tuon huomenna valmiiksi.” (= I finish that tomorrow.) Compared with the baroque constructions of various future tenses German allows that is nothing. So it’s no wonder Germans tend to live in the future and Finns right now. For a German, most things are tinged with a sense of what they will or should look like tomorrow. It’s what drives them. I’m not sure Finns see any point in that.
Having grown up in Germany, I’m stuck in between. Perhaps this project also reflects that. The completed million faces loom in my future, but in practice it’s a series of moments of instant gratification. Drawing so quickly that there’s no time to plan. I just react to the lines already there to guide the flying brush elsewhere in rhythm or against their rhythm. Picture done, I lay it away, and a new blank paper is in front of me, to be defaced (enfaced rather?) without any regard for the previous or next one.
Now, my Finnish soul rebels against these ponderings. It’s ink on paper, it’s more fun than doing nothing and I sleep better after a hundred of these. That’s enough.
ZoomInfo
renekita:

Finland has what you might call a low nonsense culture. Things are what they are and there is little need to engage in metaphysics about it or decorate life with pretty illusions.
Perhaps it stems from the fact that our language has even less of a future tense than English. There is no really comfortable way of saying: “Tomorrow, I will have done this.” “Huomenna tulen olemaan tehnyt tämän.” Oh no. It’s always rather: “Saan tuon huomenna valmiiksi.” (= I finish that tomorrow.) Compared with the baroque constructions of various future tenses German allows that is nothing. So it’s no wonder Germans tend to live in the future and Finns right now. For a German, most things are tinged with a sense of what they will or should look like tomorrow. It’s what drives them. I’m not sure Finns see any point in that.
Having grown up in Germany, I’m stuck in between. Perhaps this project also reflects that. The completed million faces loom in my future, but in practice it’s a series of moments of instant gratification. Drawing so quickly that there’s no time to plan. I just react to the lines already there to guide the flying brush elsewhere in rhythm or against their rhythm. Picture done, I lay it away, and a new blank paper is in front of me, to be defaced (enfaced rather?) without any regard for the previous or next one.
Now, my Finnish soul rebels against these ponderings. It’s ink on paper, it’s more fun than doing nothing and I sleep better after a hundred of these. That’s enough.
ZoomInfo
renekita:

Finland has what you might call a low nonsense culture. Things are what they are and there is little need to engage in metaphysics about it or decorate life with pretty illusions.
Perhaps it stems from the fact that our language has even less of a future tense than English. There is no really comfortable way of saying: “Tomorrow, I will have done this.” “Huomenna tulen olemaan tehnyt tämän.” Oh no. It’s always rather: “Saan tuon huomenna valmiiksi.” (= I finish that tomorrow.) Compared with the baroque constructions of various future tenses German allows that is nothing. So it’s no wonder Germans tend to live in the future and Finns right now. For a German, most things are tinged with a sense of what they will or should look like tomorrow. It’s what drives them. I’m not sure Finns see any point in that.
Having grown up in Germany, I’m stuck in between. Perhaps this project also reflects that. The completed million faces loom in my future, but in practice it’s a series of moments of instant gratification. Drawing so quickly that there’s no time to plan. I just react to the lines already there to guide the flying brush elsewhere in rhythm or against their rhythm. Picture done, I lay it away, and a new blank paper is in front of me, to be defaced (enfaced rather?) without any regard for the previous or next one.
Now, my Finnish soul rebels against these ponderings. It’s ink on paper, it’s more fun than doing nothing and I sleep better after a hundred of these. That’s enough.
ZoomInfo

renekita:

Finland has what you might call a low nonsense culture. Things are what they are and there is little need to engage in metaphysics about it or decorate life with pretty illusions.

Perhaps it stems from the fact that our language has even less of a future tense than English. There is no really comfortable way of saying: “Tomorrow, I will have done this.” “Huomenna tulen olemaan tehnyt tämän.” Oh no. It’s always rather: “Saan tuon huomenna valmiiksi.” (= I finish that tomorrow.) Compared with the baroque constructions of various future tenses German allows that is nothing. So it’s no wonder Germans tend to live in the future and Finns right now. For a German, most things are tinged with a sense of what they will or should look like tomorrow. It’s what drives them. I’m not sure Finns see any point in that.

Having grown up in Germany, I’m stuck in between. Perhaps this project also reflects that. The completed million faces loom in my future, but in practice it’s a series of moments of instant gratification. Drawing so quickly that there’s no time to plan. I just react to the lines already there to guide the flying brush elsewhere in rhythm or against their rhythm. Picture done, I lay it away, and a new blank paper is in front of me, to be defaced (enfaced rather?) without any regard for the previous or next one.

Now, my Finnish soul rebels against these ponderings. It’s ink on paper, it’s more fun than doing nothing and I sleep better after a hundred of these. That’s enough.

Source: renekita

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